top of page

donanım Grubu

Herkese Açık·13 üye

Boys Before Flowers (Batch With Subs) 284l



  • Age-related vision loss. There is some evidence that people who eat fish more than once weekly have a reduced risk of developing age-related vision loss. But, clinical research shows that taking fish oil by mouth for up to 5 years does not prevent vision loss.

  • Seasonal allergies (hayfever). Early research suggests that mothers who take fish oil supplements during the late stages of pregnancy may lower the occurrence of allergies in their children. But other research suggests that fish oil does not reduce the development of allergies in children when taken by the mother during pregnancy.

  • Alzheimer's disease. There is some early evidence that fish oil might help prevent Alzheimer's disease. However, it does not seem to help prevent a decline in thinking skills for most people who have already been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease.

  • Asthma. Some research suggests that fish oil supplements might help TREAT some asthma symptoms, but results are not consistent. Some research shows that taking fish oil improves breathing and reduces the need for medication, but other research suggests that fish oil does not reduce the severity of asthma is children.It is also not clear if fish oil can help PREVENT asthma. Some early research suggests that mothers who take fish oil supplements daily during pregnancy reduce the risk of asthma in their children by 35% to 63%. But, fish oil does not seem to provide any benefits when taken while breastfeeding.

  • Scaly, itchy skin (eczema). Fish oil might help PREVENT eczema, but research is not consistent. Some early research suggests that mothers who take fish oil supplements during pregnancy reduce the risk of severe eczema in their infants. Also, population research suggests that children who eat fish at least once weekly from 1 to 2 years of age have a lower risk of developing eczema. But other research, including recent studies, suggests that neither supplementation during pregnancy nor supplementation during infancy reduces the risk of eczema. Overall, research suggests that fish oil does not help TREAT eczema once it has developed.

  • Autism. Some early research suggests that taking fish oil might lower hyperactivity in children with autism. Other research suggests it does not.

  • Cancer. Research on the effects of fish oil in preventing cancer has produced conflicting results. Some population research suggests that eating fish or having higher blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil is linked to a lower risk of different cancers, including oral cancer, pharyngeal cancer, esophageal cancer, colon cancer, rectal cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and prostate cancer. But other research suggests that eating fish does not reduce the risk of cancer.

  • Cataracts. There is some early evidence that eating fish three times weekly can slightly lower the risk of developing cataracts.

  • Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). There is some conflicting evidence about the use of a specific product (Efamol Marine) that combines fish oil and evening primrose oil to reduce the symptoms CFS.

  • Chronic kidney disease. Early evidence shows that fish oil might benefit some people with chronic kidney disease who are receiving dialysis treatments. But it's not clear if fish oil helps people with poor kidney function who are otherwise healthy.

  • Abnormal cholesterol caused by clozapine. Clozapine is a drug used to treat schizophrenia. Early evidence suggests that taking fish oil reduces triglyceride levels, but increases total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL or "bad") cholesterol, in people with abnormal cholesterol levels due to taking clozapine.

  • Colorectal cancer. Some early research suggests that taking fish oil during chemotherapy might slow the progression of tumors in people with colorectal cancer.

  • Thinking problems (cognitive impairment). Some research suggests that taking 3 specific fish oil capsules (EPAX 1050TG, EPAX AS, Lysaker, Norway) by mouth daily for 12 months might improve memory in people with some cognitive impairment.

  • Crohn's disease. Research into the effects of fish oil on Crohn's disease has produced conflicting results. Some research shows that taking a specific fish oil product (Purepa, Tillotts Pharma) can reduce the relapse of Crohn's disease for people who have recovered. However, other research shows that fish oil does not have this effect.

  • Cystic fibrosis. Early research suggests that taking fish oil by mouth can improve lung function in people with cystic fibrosis. However, administering fish oil intravenously (IV) does not have this effect.

  • Memory loss (dementia). Some early research suggests that eating fish at least once per week reduces the risk of developing dementia. Other research suggests there is no link between fish consumption and the risk of dementia.

  • Depression. There is inconsistent evidence on the effect of taking fish oil for depression. Some research shows that taking fish oil along with an antidepressant might help improve symptoms in some people. Other research shows that taking fish oil does not improve depression symptoms. The conflicting results may be due to the amount of EPA and DHA in the supplement or the severity of depression before treatment.

  • Kidney damage in people with diabetes (diabetic nephropathy). Evidence suggests that taking fish oil does not improve kidney function in people with diabetic nephropathy.

  • Dyslexia. Taking fish oil by mouth seems to improve night vision in children with dyslexia.

  • Abnormal cholesterol or fat levels in the blood (dyslipidemia). There is conflicting evidence about the effects of fish oil on cholesterol and fat levels in the blood. Some research shows that taking fish oil can lower triglyceride levels, low density lipoprotein (LDL or "bad") cholesterol, and increase high density lipoprotein (HDL or "good") cholesterol in people with abnormal cholesterol levels. However, other research shows that taking fish oil daily does not have this effect.

  • Advanced kidney disease (end stage renal disease). Some evidence suggests that taking fish oil reduces markers of swelling (inflammation) in people with advanced kidney disease.

  • Epilepsy. Research suggests that taking omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil by mouth daily for 10 weeks reduces seizures in people with epilepsy that is resistant to drugs.

  • Muscle soreness due to exercise. Some research shows that taking fish oil by mouth daily for 1-6 months before and during exercise does not prevent muscle soreness in the elbow or the knee when contracted. But other research suggests that taking fish oil improves soreness from knee extension exercises.

  • Exercise performance. Some evidence suggests that taking fish oil can improve lung function in athletes. But other evidence suggests that taking fish oil does not improve endurance, recovery, heart rate, or exercise duration.

  • Preventing blockage of grafts used in kidney dialysis. Taking higher doses of fish oil short-term seems to help prevent blood clot formation in hemodialysis grafts. Taking lower doses long-term does not seem to have this effect.

  • Prediabetes. Early studies suggest that fish oil may help prevent prediabetes from advancing to type 2 diabetes.

  • Infant development. There is some evidence that mothers who eat fish or take fish oil supplements during pregnancy may improve some aspects of their baby's mental development. Taking fish oil during breast-feeding does not have this effect. However, feeding infants formula fortified with fish oil appears to improve some aspect of the baby's vision by the age of 2 months.

  • Multiple sclerosis. Taking a specific fish oil product (MaxEPA) does not appear to improve the duration, frequency, or severity of relapses in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  • Muscle strength. Some research suggests that taking fish oil daily for 90 to 150 days in addition to 90 days of resistance strength training might improve muscle growth and strength in healthy older women.

  • Weight loss. Some research shows that eating fish improves weight loss and decreases blood sugar in people who are overweight with high blood pressure. Early research also shows that taking a specific fish oil supplement (Hi-DHA, NuMega) lowers body fat when combined with exercise. But other evidence suggests that taking another specific fish oil supplement (Lovaza) does not lower body weight in overweight people.

  • Swelling of the pancreas (pancreatitis). Evidence suggests that feeding intravenously (IV) with nutrition that has been fortified with fish oil reduces the number of days of kidney replacement therapy needed by people with severe inflammation of the pancreas.

  • Phenylketonuria (PKU). Some evidence suggests that taking fish oil supplements improves motor skills, coordination, and vision in children with a rare genetic disorder called phenylketonuria.

  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Some early research shows that adding supplements containing omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil to psychoeducation does not provide any further benefits to people with PTSD.

  • Pregnancy complications. There is some evidence that taking fish oil or eating seafood during pregnancy can help prevent premature delivery. However, fish oil does not seem to help prevent high blood pressure during pregnancy.

  • Prematurity. Baby formula that has been fortified with fatty acids from fish oil and borage oil seems to improve growth and nervous system development in premature infants, especially boys.

  • Bed sores (pressure ulcers). Early research suggests that supplementing either a feeding tube or IV with fish oil for 28 days might slow the progression of pressure ulcers.

  • Salicylate intolerance. Some early research suggests that taking fish oil might improve symptoms of salicylate intolerance, such as asthma attacks and itching.

  • Schizophrenia. There is one report of fish oil improving symptoms of schizophrenia in a pregnant woman.

  • Sickle cell disease. Early research suggests that taking fish oil can reduce severe pain episodes in people with sickle cell disease.

  • Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Some early studies suggest that fish oil helps improve symptoms of SLE, while other studies show no effect.

  • Inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis). Research studies into the effects of fish oil for treating ulcerative colitis show conflicting results.

  • Glaucoma.

  • Behcet's syndrome.

  • Other conditions.

More evidence is needed to rate fish oil for these uses.




Boys Before Flowers (Batch With Subs) 284l


Download: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Fblltly.com%2F2tOAtt&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw02jjsBlsrqucvHnFXCzDrj

350c69d7ab


Hakkında

Gruba hoş geldiniz! Diğer üyelerle bağlantı kurabilir, günce...
bottom of page