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Where To Buy Red Beard Coffee


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where to buy red beard coffee


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Home News Red Beard Coffee shares the Christmas spirit Red Beard Coffee owner Clint Conant pours coffee for a customer in his Dodge City shop at the corner of 3rd Avenue and Gunsmoke Street. [PHOTO BY Andrew Evans/Dodge City Globe]


We've been searching for a local coffee shop in Tampa that has it all - good coffee (obviously), friendly service, plenty of seating and free wifi - and we finally found it: Ginger Beard Coffee!


First of all, we love the name and their logo. A play off the owners' long red beards. Second, we love their concept of being a coffee shop in the mornings and a bar (Pourhouse) at night. Genius!We met the friendly owners, Josh and Derek, on our first visit to Ginger Beard and appreciated the time they took to explain their different types of coffee and even gave us multiple samples. Their specialty is in nitrogen-infused cold coffee brews on tap with interesting flavors. The peanut butter flavor was one of the best. It doesn't taste like peanut butter at all, but had more of a hazelnut flavor. They also serve regular coffee, lattes, cappuccinos, teas, donuts, oatmeal and granola.


The vibe is very relaxing, there's plenty of room for everyone to sit and their wifi is super fast, which we really appreciate. Many of the coffee shops we go to in Tampa either don't have enough seating or there's no wifi. The owners of Ginger Beard really want their customers to feel comfortable in their space, to the point where they ask you if the volume of the music is ok.


Another bonus: they are very pet friendly! We've seen plenty of dog owners bring in their furry friends as they enjoy their coffee. There's at least one dog in the coffee shop every time we go. We've taken Kuma, our corgi, with us and she gets so much attention from the friendly workers and customers.


The coffee shop is located next to downtown Tampa in Channelside and parking is great because there are two garages that offer 2 hours of parking for free. The perfect amount of time for a coffee shop visit.


We love Ginger Beard Coffee so much that we go there every Saturday morning now to relax and enjoy that delicious nitrogen-infused coffee. Cannot say enough good things about this place. It's the best!


Specialty coffee may be found at Red Beard Coffee, a café in the heart of the city. It's a family-run business that's operated in your neighborhood. There's speciality coffee, a small selection of pastries, free wi-fi, and souvenirs available, as well as a calm, welcoming environment. Customer satisfaction and high-quality products are at the heart of all we do.


As its slogan says, the Classic Bean truly is more than a coffee shop. This treasured hometown shop in Topeka has delectable bagels that will satisfy even the pickiest of eaters as well as plenty of other baked goods and coffee favorites.


Whether you want Organic, Single Origin coffee or a unique Red Beards blend or an Energising Cold Brew, sustainably sourced from around the globe and roasted in Australia utilising a Smokeless Carbon Neutral Quality and Assurance HACCP Accredited Roaster to guarantee our microlot & small batch roasted Premium Specialty Coffee Beans are fresh and won't leave you marooned.


A question I get asked fairly often is: Where do your recipes come from? Are they family recipes? Traditional? Regional? Seasonal? Do I happen upon them in my travels? Do they bubble up out of nowhere?


Some of you know how fond I am of coffee, especially in dessert form, like this one and this one (paywall). I have a new one to add to the roster: Frozen Espresso Zabaglione. I came up with this recipe, adapted from one in the New York Times, in collaboration with Mr. Espresso, an Oakland, CA-based coffee company. The company, founded in 1978 by Carlo DiRuocco, has a great backstory: When Carlo immigrated to California from Salerno, south of Naples, he was disappointed by the lack of good coffee. He began slow-roasting beans over an oak wood fire, as he had learned in Italy, and selling them to local cafés and restaurants. Mr. Espresso is still family-run and its beans are still oak wood-roasted.


4. Set the bowl with the egg and coffee mixture over the pot of simmering water and whisk constantly until the eggs start to warm up and turn foamy. You may need to use a kitchen towel to grasp the bowl as it heats up. After about 5 minutes, maybe less, the egg mixture will start to thicken and grow in volume. Keep whisking until the zabaglione has at least doubled in volume and you can see tracks from the whisk or beaters. This could take another 5 minutes or so.


In this case it was a package of Pasta Gragnano in Corsa, a top-shelf brand made in Gragnano, near Naples, where dried pasta has been produced for hundreds of years. In spite of the smallish font, the recipe for Pasta, Cozze, e Patate (pasta, mussels, and potatoes) caught my eye for several reasons:* First: It involved pasta and potatoes, a classic Neapolitan combination. People furrow their brows at the thought of putting these two carbs together in the same dish, but it works; the diced potatoes collapse just a bit and make a sort of rustic creamy sauce, and the whole thing feels like a hug.* Second: It starred mussels, a shellfish that IMO is way underappreciated, in the U.S. anyway, and which I personally love. Fresh mussels, properly cooked, are plump, briny, and sweet. And they\u2019re easy to cook.* Third: Pecorino cheese. At the end of cooking, as you\u2019re mixing everything together\u2014pasta, mussels, and potatoes\u2014you throw in a handful of grated Pecorino cheese. A dish that breaks the rules! Having already tried and loved another rule-breaking pasta dish with seafood and cheese, I had a good feeling about this one. (You\u2019ll find the printable recipe below.)


This dish is simple and rustic, but at the same time it feels a little elegant (maybe because of the mussels?). So even if it came from the back of a package of pasta it would make a lovely Valentine\u2019s Day dinner, with a peppery arugula salad on the side and a dainty little coffee dessert (more on that below).


A word about mussels: Some of you might be wrinkling your nose at the thought of having to clean and de-beard mussels, or that they are a fussy ingredient in general, or not safe to cook at home. These concerns are mostly outdated. Most of the mussels sold in the U.S. are farmed, and the dirt and grit is removed before you buy them. Unlike some forms of aquaculture, mussel farming, where the mollusks are \u201Cseeded\u201D and grown on ropes submerged in coastal waters, is environmentally friendly. You can read more about the process here.


Some of you know how fond I am of coffee, especially in dessert form, like this one and this one (paywall). I have a new one to add to the roster: Frozen Espresso Zabaglione. I came up with this recipe, adapted from one in the New York Times, in collaboration with Mr. Espresso, an Oakland, CA-based coffee company. The company, founded in 1978 by Carlo DiRuocco, has a great backstory: When Carlo immigrated to California from Salerno, south of Naples, he was disappointed by the lack of good coffee. He began slow-roasting beans over an oak wood fire, as he had learned in Italy, and selling them to local caf\u00E9s and restaurants. Mr. Espresso is still family-run and its beans are still oak wood-roasted.


Since I love strong espresso (double shot), I used Mr. Espresso Neapolitan Roast to make the coffee zabaglione. It\u2019s a medium-dark roast, with deep chocolate and toffee notes. If you prefer your coffee a bit more tame, but still rich, try their Tuscan or Triestino roast. (You can read more about Mr. Espresso\u2019s various coffee blends and roasts here.)


To celebrate Valentine\u2019s Day\u2014or coffee\u2014I\u2019m giving away a bag each of Neapolitan Roast and Tuscan Roast, courtesy of Mr. Espresso. The giveaway is open to paid subscribers and it\u2019s easy to enter: just leave me a comment about your favorite way to enjoy coffee: espresso, cappuccino, cortado, correto, in a dessert, or however you prefer it. Two winners will be chosen at random and announced in next week\u2019s newsletter.


Another word about mussels: It\u2019s always a good idea, when buying mussels, or any fresh seafood, to know where it comes from. The tag on the bag of mussels I bought at a local fish store showed they came from American Mussel Harvesters, so I looked it up. The farm is located off the coast of Rhode Island, and the mussels are cultivated without antibiotics or artificial food, so I felt confident they would be safe.


2. While the potatoes are cooking, prepare the mussels. Check to make sure they are alive and fresh. They should smell briny and not at all fishy, and they should be tightly closed; if any are open, tap them lightly against the countertop. They should close up within a few seconds. If they stay open, toss them. Place the mussels in a colander and scrub them under cold water to remove any dirt or grit. (Most mussels available in the U.S. are farmed and cleaned before you buy them, so you don\u2019t usually have beards to pull off.). Put them in a large saucepan and pour in about 3/4 cup water\u2014enough so that they are resting in about 1/2 inch of water. Cover and cook on medium-high to high heat until the mussels start to open, 3 to 5 minutes. Rather than wait for all of them to open, I start removing the ones that open first so that they don\u2019t overcook, transferring them with tongs to a bowl. Once all the mussels have been transferred, pour the liquid remaining in the pot through a fine mesh sieve lined with damp paper towel into a bowl or liquid measuring cup. You should have at least 1 cup liquid. Set it aside. 041b061a72


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